The Unholy Structure of Two-Year Election Cycles

The 2020 election is only 14 months away and we are between last years’ midterms and next years’ presidential contest. When you have election fatigue, take a step back and think about the systems behind our electoral process. Public Sector Consortium President Georgie Bishop recently wrote a piece for Thrive on The Unholy Structures of Two-Year Election Cycles asking us:

“Imagine if your job required you to make decisions about the federal or state budget, the protection of the environment and climate change, public education, public health, national defense and foreign affairs in addition to almost everything else that affects your ability to thrive and survive in a civil society. At the federal level your job requires you to understand and forge partnerships with 434 other elected leaders, some of whom have very different constituencies and values. Imagine that you are accountable to roughly 700,000 citizens who want to let you know how they feel and count on your decision-making skills. Then imagine that after the first nine months of elected office you are told you must raise 1.5 million dollars by the following year if you want to continue doing your job. It seems impossible to do yet this is what we ask of 435 people that we pay to represent us in the United States House of Representatives each year.”

Check out the entire story at Thrive Global

With several presidential debates underway this summer and early fall there’s public discussion about leadership and in some candidates are talking about climate change as well. For a private sector perspective on sustainable leadership check out one of the books featured in our resource library- The Plot to Save the Planet: How Visionary Entrepreneurs and Corporate Titans Are Creating Real Solutions to Global Warming by Brian Dumaine. Click here to search all of the books in our resource library